Notes from the field (October 2015)

The first dry season during which the Igunga Eco-Village project started to take shape has come and gone. Staff from Igunga District Council, Heifer Tanzania and from the 3R consortium (including Aqua for All, Acacia Water, MetaMeta and Rain Foundation) extensively visited the nine target villages. In the nine villages the Village Development Councils were sensitized about the project, committees for the relevant components were established and the first steps in establishing the farmer field school were made.

During this first dry season the people from the villages were familiarized with the intentions of the project and the project team was familiarized with major challenges and opportunities in the villages.

The team has made a map with photo’s including some landscapes, building and water and agriculture features in an around the nine villages. Look at:

Water
Whereas Igunga district has 850 millimeters of rainfall during the rainy season the easy access to this water is limited to several months after the rainy season. This accessibility directly relates to the availability, as rivers run dry and groundwater levels drop the top of the earth dries out. Opportunities are however already being explored also by the villages to capture more of the water to be able to replenish groundwater, keep soils moist and avoid evaporation.

Water is drawn from a scoophole in a dried up river bed.
Photo 1: Water is drawn from a scoophole in a dried up river bed.
Water is drawn from the main canal of the Mwamapuli Rice Irrigation scheme, south of Igunga town.
Photo 2: Water is drawn from the main canal of the Mwamapuli Rice Irrigation scheme, south of Igunga town.
Woman scooping water from a hole dug into the slope of a hill.
Photo 3: Woman scooping water from a hole dug into the slope of a hill.

Agriculture
The villages around Igunga town grow cotton on the so called ‘black-cotton soils’, where as on the other soils including the Phaeozems and the Eutric Leptosols, crops such as maize, sweet potatoes, cowpeas, grounduts, and some sunflower and sesame. In and around the irrigation scheme of Mwamapuli however rice is grown, which is then also the major staple crop of the district and together with cotton an important cash crop for the farmers.

Head end of the Mwamapuli Rice Irrigation Sceheme, 600ha within the scheme perimetre are irrigated and another 1500ha outside the Mwamapuli Rice Cooperative perimetre.
Photo 4: Head end of the Mwamapuli Rice Irrigation Sceheme, 600ha within the scheme perimetre are irrigated and another 1500ha outside the Mwamapuli Rice Cooperative perimetre.
In a dry river bed, collected Acacia is drawn by oxen to use it for protecting plots, water points or pens from other livestock or wild animals.
Photo 5: In a dry river bed, collected Acacia is drawn by oxen to use it for protecting plots, water points or pens from other livestock or wild animals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Infrastructure
Igunga is located along the main road between Dodoma and Mwanza or also from Dar es Salaam to Burundi, Rwanda and the east of Congo. A lot of heavy traffic passes through the town each day, and local restaurants and guesthouses run well on travelers that pass through and eat or stay for the night. The roads connecting the wards and villages with Igunga town, consist of gravel or unpaved roads that become dusty in the dry season, and particularly difficult to drive on in the wet season.

Bicycles are well used in Igunga district, proving a valuable means of transport for people and goods.
Photo 6: Bicycles are well used in Igunga district, proving a valuable means of transport for people and goods.
Bicycles are well used in Igunga district, proving a valuable means of transport for people and goods.
Photo 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Even in the dry season dry river beds can be treacherous to cross.
Photo 8: Even in the dry season dry river beds can be treacherous to cross.
The coarse dry sand that accumulates in the river beds, is also useful resource that is excavated for building purposes.
Photo 9: The coarse dry sand that accumulates in the river beds, is also useful resource that is excavated for building purposes.
 Notes from the field (October 2015)

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